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Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations

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dc.contributor.author Kushnick, Geoff
dc.contributor.author Hanowell, Ben
dc.contributor.author Jun-Hong, Kim
dc.contributor.author Langstieh, Banrida
dc.contributor.author Magnano, Vittorio
dc.contributor.author Oláh, Katalin
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-09T16:56:01Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-09T16:56:01Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.citation Kushnick, G., Hanowell, B., Kim, J. H., Langstieh, B., Magnano, V., & Oláh, K. (2015). Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations. Royal Society Open Science, 2(6). spa
dc.identifier.issn 20545703
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11268/4678
dc.description.abstract Maternal care decision rules should evolve responsiveness to factors impinging on the fitness pay-offs of care. Because the caretaking environments common in industrialized and small-scale societies vary in predictable ways, we hypothesize that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour will also differ between these two types of populations. We used a factorial vignette experiment to elicit third-party judgements about likely caretaking decisions of a hypothetical mother and her child when various fitness-relevant factors (maternal age and access to resources, and offspring age, sex and quality) were varied systematically in seven populations—three industrialized and four small-scale. Despite considerable variation in responses, we found that three of five main effects, and the two severity effects, exhibited statistically significant industrialized/ small-scale population differences. All differences could be explained as adaptive solutions to industrialized versus small-scale caretaking environments. Further, we found gradients in the relationship between the population-specific estimates and national-level socio-economic indicators, further implicating important aspects of the variation in industrialized and small-scale caretaking environments in shaping heuristics. Although there is mounting evidence for a genetic component to human maternal behaviour, there is no current evidence for interpopulation variation in candidate genes. We nonetheless suggest that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour in diverse societies emerge via convergent evolution in response to similar selective pressures. spa
dc.description.sponsorship SIN FINANCIACIÓN spa
dc.language.iso eng spa
dc.rights Attribution 4.0 International *
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ *
dc.subject.other Behavioural ecology spa
dc.subject.other Maternal care spa
dc.subject.other Convergent evolution spa
dc.title Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations spa
dc.type article spa
dc.description.impact No data (2015) spa
dc.identifier.doi 10.1098/rsos.140518
dc.rights.accessRights openAccess spa
dc.subject.uem Salud spa
dc.subject.uem Comportamiento spa
dc.subject.unesco Salud spa
dc.subject.unesco Comportamiento spa
dc.description.filiation UEV spa
dc.peerreviewed Si spa


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Attribution 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International